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How To Display Your Amazon Reviews and Wish List (on your site) Using Amazon’s Web Services

October 6th, 2008

If you’ve ever landed on Amazon then you’re probably familiar with their reviews and wish lists. Amazon provides access to these items (and many-many more) through their extensive web services – the Amazon web services can be complex and overwhelming when all you want is a review list and a single user specific wish list. For this site I wanted to pull in my reviews and wish list – displaying them alongside my blog. It’s fair to note, that user reviews are available via an RSS feed (but this feed doesn’t include all the details I wanted) and the wish list page still doesn’t provide an RSS feed. So a custom Amazon web service request was in order.

Let me try to make this story short.

If you want to request your reviews and your wish list you need the following:

Once you have a wish list or review, you then need to:

Once you’ve collected all those bits, you need to:

  • Checkout and download the source code for the project and build the assembly or download the pre-compiled assembly.
  • Add the assembly reference to your project (remember, I’m assuming you’re using .NET).
  • Make a call to the application which will generate XML files containing your respective reviews and wish list.

Setting up the call would look something like this:

IAmazonRequest amazonRequest = new AmazonRequest() {
 AssociateTag = "adamkahtavaap-20",
  AWSAccessKeyId = "1MRF________MR2",
  CustomerId = "A2JM0EQJELFL69",
  ListId = "3JU6ASKNUS7B8"
};

IFileParameters fileParameters = new FileParameters() {
  ProductFileNameAndPath = @"Products.xml",
  ReviewFileNameAndPath = @"Reviews.xml",
  ErrorFileNameAndPath = @"Errors.xml"
 };

IAmazonApplication amazonApplication = new AmazonApplication(amazonRequest, fileParameters);

amazonApplication.Save();

And Viola!

If you’d like to provide some design guidance, fix a bug, or request a feature, then visit (or join) the project on Google Code.

Alternatively, you might also be interested in the LINQ To Amazon source featured in the book LINQ in Action.

Author: Adam Kahtava Categories: .NET, ASP.NET, Amazon, Open Source, Software, XML Tags:
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