Archive

Archive for September, 2009

Introducing my Whois Service: Customize Your Site Content Based On Referrals, Location, and More

September 30th, 2009

Services-services-services! Enough already! Today I introduce my Whois and Enhanced Whois Web Service.

The Enhanced Whois web service lets me know where my visitor are geographically located, provides filtering capabilities, and can act on referrals. This will allow me (or you) to personalize site greetings, hide my email address (or content) based on the visitor, and provide a unique personal experience. Alternately I can use this service as a classic Whois service.

How it works.

We’re not anonymous on the internet and IP addresses are what uniquely defines your internet existence. Whois services let us determine the registrant of internet resources.

Using my Whois service you can:

View your enhanced whois record.

By the visitor’s IP address (your IP) URI:

http://adam.kahtava.com/services/whois/enhanced.{xml|json}

Example:

Request: http://adam.kahtava.com/services/whois/enhanced.xml

Response (using my IP):

<WhoisEnhancedRecord xmlns="http://adam.kahtava.com/services/whois" xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
  <City>Calgary</City>
  <Country>Canada</Country>
  <FilterMatches i:nil="true"/>
  <FriendlyMatches i:nil="true"/>
  <IsFilterMatch>false</IsFilterMatch>
  <IsFriendly>false</IsFriendly>
  <Organization>Shaw Communications Inc.</Organization>
  <StateProvince>AB</StateProvince>
</WhoisEnhancedRecord>

By the visitor’s IP address specifying a referrer, and a filter URI:

http://adam.kahtava.com/services/whois/enhanced.{xml|json}?filters={filters,filters,…}&referrer={referrer}

Example:

Request: http://adam.kahtava.com/services/whois/enhanced/xml?filters=CA&referrer=Twitter

Response (from an IP owned by Google, with a filter for California, and a referrer of Twitter specified):

<WhoisEnhancedRecord xmlns="http://adam.kahtava.com/services/whois" xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
  <City>Mountain View</City>
  <Country>United states</Country>
  <FilterMatches>
    <string>StateProvince</string>
  </FilterMatches>
  <FriendlyMatches>
    <string>google</string>
    <string>twitter</string>
  </FriendlyMatches>
  <IsFilterMatch>true</IsFilterMatch>
  <IsFriendly>true</IsFriendly>
  <Organization>Google Inc.</Organization>
  <StateProvince>CA</StateProvince>
</WhoisEnhancedRecord>

View your classic Whois record.

By the visitor’s IP address (your IP) URI:

http://adam.kahtava.com/services/whois.{xml|json}

Example:

Request: http://adam.kahtava.com/services/whois.xml

Response (using my IP):
<WhoisRecord xmlns="http://adam.kahtava.com/services/whois" xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
  <DomainName>68.146.10.100</DomainName>
  <RegistryData>
  <AbuseContact> ... </AbuseContact>
  <AdministrativeContact i:nil="true"/>
  <BillingContact i:nil="true"/>
  <CreatedDate>2002-06-03</CreatedDate>
  <RawText> ... </RawText>
  <Registrant>
    <Address>Suite 800630 - 3rd Ave. SW</Address>
    <City>Calgary</City>
    <Country>CA</Country>
    <Name>Shaw Communications Inc.</Name>
    <PostalCode>T2P-4L4</PostalCode>
    <StateProv>AB</StateProv>
  </Registrant>
  ...
</WhoisRecord>

So… why is this useful?

This is the first step for this site’s personalization – if I know where the user came from, where the user is geographically located, and have the capabilities to filter their Whois responses, then I can tailor my content to the user. For example: if someone from Google landed on my site I could mention that I’d love to work there and provide my email address and phone number, similarly if someone from Calgary landed on my site I could provide my public calendar of local events. The possibilities are endless.

This service will be wrapped by a JavaScript widget that will take care of the asynchronous service polling, but that sounds like another post.

Contribute, view, or download the openly available source code here.

Author: Adam Kahtava Categories: .NET, ADC Services, Open Source, RESTful, Services, WCF, XML Tags:

Introducing my LinkedIn Resume Service: View Your Resume

September 24th, 2009

In my last post I mentioned that I was creating a couple web services that would hopefully bring together my online portfolio. Today I introduce my LinkedIn Resume Web Service.

How it works.

If you have a resume on LinkedIn and you’ve added services@adamdotcom.com as a contact then you can:

View your resume – retrieve your Resume by first and last name.

By first and last name URI:

http://adam.kahtava.com/services/resume/linkedin/{firstName-lastName}.{xml|json}

Example:

Request: http://adam.kahtava.com/services/resume/linkedin/adam-kahtava.xml

Response:

<Resume xmlns="http://adam.kahtava.com/services/resume" xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
  <Educations>
    <Education>
      <Certificate>Computer Programming and Analysis</Certificate>
      <Institute>Seneca College of Applied Arts and Technology</Institute>
    </Education>
    <Education>
      <Certificate>Bachelor of Science (Honours), Computer Science</Certificate>
      <Institute>Trent University</Institute>
    </Education>
  </Educations>
  <Positions>
    <Position>
      <Company>Corbis ...

Wow that was exciting, so now what?

Well.. Head on over to my resume page. My resume is being pulled from LinkedIn through this very service.

Contribute, view, or download the openly available source code here.

Author: Adam Kahtava Categories: .NET, ADC Services, Open Source, RESTful, Services, WCF, XML Tags:

Introducing my Amazon Web Service: Find Your Profile, View Your Wishlist or Reviews

September 15th, 2009

My online portfolio is increasingly scattered through the internet (reviews and wishlist are on Amazon, source code on github / Google Projects, resume on LinkedIn, and so on). I’ve been working on a couple services that will eventually pull my portfolio together while keeping a single point of reference, and… I’m sharing these services.

Introducing my Amazon Web Service.

How it works.

Basically if you have a Wishlist or a Review list on Amazon you can:

Discover your profile – retrieve your ListId (for WishLists) or CustomerId (for Reviews):

Discovery URI:

http://adam.kahtava.com/services/amazon/discover/user/{user-name}.{xml|json}

Example:

Request: http://adam.kahtava.com/services/amazon/discover/user/adam-kahtava.xml

Response:

<Profile xmlns="http://adam.kahtava.com/services/amazon" xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
  <CustomerId>A2JM0EQJELFL69</CustomerId>
  <ListId>3JU6ASKNUS7B8</ListId>
</Profile>

View your Reviews - retrieve your Reviews by username or Amazon CustomerId.

By customerId URI:

http://adam.kahtava.com/services/amazon/reviews/id/{customerId}.{xml|json}

By username URI:

http://adam.kahtava.com/services/amazon/reviews/user/{user-name}.{xml|json}

Example:

Request: http://adam.kahtava.com/services/amazon/reviews/id/A2JM0EQJELFL69.xml

Response:

<Reviews xmlns="http://adam.kahtava.com/services/amazon" xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
  <Review>
    <ASIN>0321125215</ASIN>
    <Authors>Eric Evans</Authors>
    <AuthorsMLA>Evans Eric.</AuthorsMLA>
    <Content>Through this book Evan's ...

View your Wishlist - view your Wishlist by username or Amazon ListId.

By listId URI:

http://adam.kahtava.com/services/amazon/wishlist/id/{listId}.{xml|json}

By username URI:

http://adam.kahtava.com/services/amazon/wishlist/user/{user-name}.{xml|json}

Example:

Request: http://adam.kahtava.com/services/amazon/wishlist/user/adam-kahtava.json

Response:

[{"ASIN":"0471467413","Authors":"Mostafa Abd-El-Barr, Hesham El-Rewini", ...

So now what?

Head on over to my Reviews and Reading List pages. These pages make use of the data from this service. I should also mention that, this service was built on a previous iteration of my Amazon Web Service (How To Display Your Amazon Reviews and Wish List Using Amazon’s Web Services).

Contribute, view, or download the openly available source code here.

Fun with “Bugs Bugs Bugs, If I had them all in jugs”, Bugbears, Bohrbugs, Schroedinbugs

September 14th, 2009

Some software bug trivia.

Where did the term ‘bug’ originate?

According to Phil Factor:

The word ‘bug’ actually is short for Bugbear, sometimes found as Bugaboo. The meaning is much closer to ‘Gremlin’, where the people who worked on engineering prototypes often grew to suspect that the problems were due to malicious spooks. I sometimes still hear it said that a particular piece of software is cursed with malicious spirits. The ‘Bug’ or ‘Bogey’ part of the word is traceable back to the fifteenth century in the meaning of ‘Hobogoblin’, devil or ghost. … the word ‘Bugbear’, first recorded in the sixteenth century, is still used in referring to problems with machinery. – Confessions of an IT Manager, Phil Factor

How many bug types can you name off?

Wikipedia lists six types of bugs: HeisenbugsBohrbugsMandelbugsSchroedinbugsPhase of the Moon bugs, and Statistical bugs.

Which music should you listen to while squishing software bugs?

The Bug Song by Canada’s Stompin’ Tom Connors of course.

Bugs Bugs Bugs, If I had them all in jugs
I’d dig dig dig, till a big big hole was dug dug dug dug–
And that would be the end of the bug song…repeat

Author: Adam Kahtava Categories: Musings, Quality Assurance Tags:

Thoughts on Social Media: It’s Like TV

September 11th, 2009

I once had a strong aversion to Social Media (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, FriendFeed, pick the site of the week, …) but today I embrace it. In the old days, I thought these sites were silly, a waste of time, and preferred to spend more of my time pursuing technical / academic activities. In retrospect, I think I was feeling insecure in my technical abilities (placing to much focus on technical pursuits), I probably thought I had a boring life (and thought everyone else was bragging about theirs), and I certainly misunderstood the fundamentals of Social Media (somehow I thought being part of the conversation meant I had to consume everything).

I eventually realized that Social Media is a lot like TV. TV is overwhelmed with commercials and mediocre shows, the content is hard to find. When I watch TV (if I watch TV) I mute the commercials, flip through the channels looking for something interesting, and multitask (magazine, laptop, …). In the end TV is a leisure activity, I don’t try watching every channel (I know I can’t) and don’t pay attention to the advertisements. I do the same thing on Social Media sites too. I don’t pay attention to every post (I can’t) and I don’t pay attention to self promotion, promotions, or advertisements.

Today I embrace Social Media because it lets me participate in the conversation, share my opinion, connect with friends and family, and be an active part of our world. Oh yeah, and it’s fun too!

“Don’t be shy … or nobody will know you’re there” - Yusuf Islam / Cat Stevens

Author: Adam Kahtava Categories: Musings, Personal, Twitter Tags: