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Running Philosophies

March 13th, 2015

Finding running advice online is tough, fortunately there are many great books on the subject. Here are a collection of quotes and sources that influence my running philosophies.

Keep it frequent. Keep it consistent.

“How often you work out is the most basic element of training for long-distance [events] … consistent frequency throughout the year is the most effective way to maintain fitness” – Going Long (37)

“inconsistency in training makes for a never-ending struggle to maintain … fitness” – Hansons Marathon Method (12)

Run at least 30 minutes. Get used to running frequently, then extend these short runs later in the season.

“Even a 25-minute run is better than forgoing a workout altogether” – Hansons Marathon Method (110)

“I suggest a minimum of 30 minutes for most [easy] runs; the stress isn’t great, and the benefits are substantial.” – Daniel’s Running Formula (98)

Long runs start at 90 minutes. Be careful exceeding 3 hours.

“endurance training stimulates [glycogen storage and fat utilization] and increases the capillarization of your muscles … stimulate these adaptations [by running] 90 minutes or longer” – Advanced Marathoning (14)

“place a two-and-a-half-hour limit on [long runs] … Runs of three hours or more aren’t popular for elite runners .. Ultramarathoners and some marathoners will benefit from runs in excess of [38km]” – Daniel’s Running Formula (98)

“If you regularly do [two-and-a-half hour runs], you’ll become strong but slow … You’ll also increase your risk of injury because [fatigued muscles] lose their ability to absorb impact” – Advanced Marathoning (15)

“2-3 hours is the optimal window for metobolic adaptations in terms of long runs. Beyond that, muscle break down begins to occur. ” – Hansons Marathon Method (52)

“it is best to be a little conservative about the long stuff. This approach will enable you to recover quickly, maintain consistency, and avoid injury.” – Going Long (11)

Tempo / lactate threshold workouts are great for long distance runners. Speed / interval sessions are good too. Do some every week.

“A high lactate threshold is the most important physiological variable for endurance athletes” – Advanced Marathoning (5)

Keep your workouts under control.

“perform your tempo runs under desirable weather conditions and on relatively flat terrain with good footing … the goal … is to maintain a steady intensity … You can monitor your heart rate, but a steady rhythm under constant conditions is what you want” – Daniel’s Running Formula (113)

Rest once a week or whenever you need it.

“you should always take either an easy day or a rest day between [planned] workouts” – Hansons Marathon Method (109)

“Take a complete rest day once a week” – Going Long (15)

Try not to take two consecutive rest days.

“While recovery is important, cumulative fatigue calls for only partial recuperation” – Hansons Marathon Method (14)

“If you must take two days off per week, try not to have them be two days off in a row.” – Going Long (7)

“After two days … insulin response was dropping, oxidative stress was rising, and metabolic activity within individual muscle cells was slowing” – Don’t just sit there

Author: Adam Kahtava Categories: Running Tags:
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